Caveo Learning

Corporate Strategy and Learning Center

Insight and Inspiration Can Promote Creativity in Learning

Posted by Terry Goins with Star Fisher on August 16, 2018

Are you struggling to be creative? Do your eLearning courses seem uninspiring? If so, do not despair. You may be surprised at the number of instructional designers and trainers who lament their lack of creativity—especially when their businesses expect continuous innovation.

If you want to build creative learning activities, no matter what the medium—in-person, virtual instructor-led, or digital learning—first clarify your purpose for the activity. Ask: “What learning do I want the participants to achieve?” Start with the end goal in mind, or your creativity could miss its mark with recipients.

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Learning that Crosses Borders

Posted by Renie McClay on June 20, 2018

Audiences are becoming more and more diverse. With varieties of native languages in the room, it is important to look at what is helpful as well as what may hinder or confuse when designing learning. You may be designing learning for a French-owned firm that needs to train English speakers. Or it may be a US-owned firm, with global customers and employees. It may be something specific like onboarding or selling skills in varying languages and with varying cultural references.

While you may have done instructional design for many years, an expanded definition of instructional design from a global view is the artistic ability to get the lesson across to any culture or in any language. Here are tips and suggestions to help accomplish objectives across a varied audience when designing or delivering training.

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Bring Dry Training to Life with Characters, Conflict, and a Realistic Plot

Posted by Brian Ziemba on April 24, 2018

Training content on onboarding information, product knowledge, or processes can be inherently dry and hard to deliver in an engaging manner. But dry or not, this content is important for employees to learn about their workplace, the processes they need to follow, regulations they need to comply with, and changes or initiatives happening throughout the company. It’s up to the training department to deliver this content properly.

However, because this information often does not apply directly to everyday tasks, it’s difficult to train using performance-oriented learning methods. Therefore, before training on informational content, it’s important to consider the learners’ perspective, existing knowledge, and how motivated they are to learn the content.

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Create Learner Engagement with a Learning Map

Posted by Joelyne Marshall on April 11, 2018

We are in a time where organizations are offering up robust training programs to their workforces. No longer do learners have a flat, one-instance training event. L&D departments are designing full-scale programs with stages of training for their learners. These programs direct a learner through their learning journey over the course of several weeks or even months. That journey involves multiple stops where the learner will interact with a variety of training deliverables in different formats, such as instructor-led, eLearning, virtual instructor-led, social learning, and self-paced asynchronous learning.

These comprehensive, blended training programs allow learners to engage with the content in a variety of ways. This variety is a bonus for learners and organizations—it enhances learning and content retention and drives the learner toward achieving the training’s business goals. But, these complex programs can create some chaos for the learner if they aren’t organized and structured in a way that the learner can easily navigate them. This is where a learning map comes into play.

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Create Engaging Participant Guides

Posted by Brian Ziemba on March 6, 2018

Participant guides can be valuable tools for maintaining learner engagement and reinforcing on-the-job performance when developed as part of instructor-led training. Unfortunately, many times the participant guide is created quickly, if at all, at the end of a project and only includes images of the slides from the presentation. You expect your facilitators to engage the learners, not just to read bullet points on slides. Support your learners' performance by providing high-quality participant guides that are developed concurrently with the facilitator's guides and that provide unique content to the learner.

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Tips for Creating Reusable Learning Objects

Posted by Joelyne Marshall on January 26, 2018

With the influx of more blended programs for the learners in our organizations, Learning & Development is challenged to design training programs that are more complex and could possibly take more time to develop. With a variety of deliverables in play, those who manage L&D teams and efforts are wise to keep their eyes on the horizon to strategically design programs that service their client’s needs while also taking advantage of efficient ways to develop those comprehensive programs. Repurposing elements—or objects—from and within existing learning deliverables is one way to work toward this efficiency.

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Learning Retention: Beyond the Classroom

Posted by Brian Ziemba on January 4, 2018

In a recent blog, we pointed out strategies to increase learning retention by using what we know about human memory, but what about after the training event is over? How do we make sure it sticks?

In many organizations, learning is seen as a one-time event, often in a different location from the job site, and once it's over, the learning on that content is over. But in order to reinforce the application of the learning and identify the actual retention, we need to think of training as a continual process and extend it beyond the one event.

There are several practical ways to ensure knowledge transfer, and implementing these can improve the investment your organization has made in training employees.

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Project Managers Are 'Glue' Holding Learning Projects Together

Posted by Renie McClay on August 15, 2017

To achieve business stakeholder satisfaction with a completed learning & development initiative, learning project managers must aim for success in three key areas. The first two are rather obvious: complete the project on time and on budget, and successfully fulfill the end business objectives. But the third item can be a little trickier—deftly manage the stakeholder relationship.

In the context of L&D project management, effective stakeholder management means adequately involving them in development of the project without distracting them from their “day jobs.” As Leonard Cochran, manager of learning programs for Hilton University, puts it: “My intent is to make them feel as if I'm an extension of their team who is solely focused on their project so they can be at ease.”

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Plan to Make Review Cycles Part of Learning Project Success

Posted by Joelyne Marshall on August 7, 2017

The process that learning & development professionals follow when designing and developing learning deliverables helps all players on the project team complete their specified tasks. The review cycle stage—when the deliverables are examined by the stakeholder—is perhaps most critical.

Before the learning project begins, it's crucial to determine when reviews will take place, what needs to be reviewed (and to what depth), how long reviews should take, etc. The learning project plan should take all of this into consideration early on, and it’s important to establish expectations and set the foundation for the “how” in relation to review cycles. Here are some basic guidelines for managing and executing review cycles for both the stakeholder and the L&D team.

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Don't Overlook the Value of Storytelling in Instructional Design

Posted by Elizabeth Mills on June 29, 2017

Storytelling captures and moves people, which is why it is such a powerful tool for instructional designers and other learning professionals. Great stories prompt action, change minds, and win business. Put simply, stories make people care about the issue at hand.

To achieve their purpose, stories don’t need to be long and involved. Short scenarios can pull in learners and facilitate comprehension, helping them grasp and retain information, and prompting them to act. Stories can be effective in all learning modalities, from digital learning experiences to classroom-based instructor-led training. Whether conveyed orally, visually, or in writing, stories engage learners’ hearts and minds, triggering them to think and respond in engaging ways.

Story elements, when incorporated into eLearning, can improve learner engagement. The before and after examples of the following eLearning excerpts illustrate how elements of a story can enhance learning...

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